Nov 092022
 

In August, the Tulsa police department held a press conference about how its new Automated License Plate Readers (ALPRs), a controversial piece of surveillance technology, was the policing equivalent of “turning the lights on” for the first time. In Ontario, California, the city put out a press release about how its ALPRs were a “vital resource.” In Madison, South Dakota, local news covered how the city’s expenditure of $30,000 for ALPRs “paid off” twice in two days.  
All these stories have two things in common: One, they are all about the same brand of ALPRs, Flock Safety. And two, they’re all reminders of how surveillance technology companies are coaching police behind the scenes on how best…

External feed Read More at the Source: https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2022/11/rise-police-advertiser

 2022-11-09  No Responses »
Nov 092022
 

Website blocking has become an increasingly common anti-piracy tool around the globe.
In dozens of countries, ISPs have been ordered by courts to block pirate sites, usually on copyright grounds. More recently, neutral DNS providers have been targeted as well.
Earlier this year, an Italian court ordered Cloudflare to block three torrent sites on its public 1.1.1.1 DNS resolver. The order applies to kickasstorrents.to, limetorrents.pro, and ilcorsaronero.pro, three domains that are already blocked by ISPs in Italy following an order from local regulator AGCOM.
Cloudflare Appeals DNS Blocking Order
Disappointed by the ruling, Cloudflare filed an appeal at the Court of Milan. The internet infrastructure company doesn’t object to blocking requests that target its customers’ websites but believes…

External feed Read More at the Source: https://torrentfreak.com/court-upholds-piracy-blocking-order-against-cloudflares-1-1-1-1-dns-resolver-221109/

 2022-11-09  No Responses »
Nov 092022
 

Law enforcement needs probable cause to effect arrests and engage in searches. In most cases, a warrant is also required. It’s a bit of paperwork that allows the government to bypass Fourth Amendment protections to serve the greater good, i.e., the invasion of privacy (a search) or the removal of personal freedom (an arrest).
For far too many cops, obtaining a warrant is a hassle they’d rather not deal with, even if it’s rarely an actual hassle. So, they find ways to route around this rights-related roadblock. Drug dogs are called to scenes so an animal can tell cops it’s ok to engage in a search. Pretextual stops use real or perceived traffic infractions as fishing licenses…

External feed Read More at the Source: https://www.techdirt.com/2022/11/08/appeals-court-says-st-louis-countys-warrantless-arrests-are-likely-unconstitutional-but-somehow-still-pretty-much-ok/

 2022-11-09  No Responses »
Nov 092022
 

The Department of Homeland Security is helping to coordinate tech company censorship efforts according to recent reporting. The line between tech firms and the national security state is only getting blurrier.
President Joe Biden, appearing via teleconference, delivers remarks at a White House meeting. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas sits in the foreground. August 3, 2022. (Win McNamee / Getty Images) The steady march of the post-2016 tech censorship campaign has been picking up pace lately, and we’ve just learned of another leap forward. According to recent major reporting from the Intercept, the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has been involved in efforts aimed at corralling what it…

External feed Read More at the Source: https://jacobin.com/2022/11/dhs-big-tech-surveillance-censorship-mdm/

 2022-11-09  No Responses »
Nov 092022
 

The recent Supercon 6 badge, if you haven’t seen it, was an old-fashioned type computer with a blinky light front panel. It was reminiscent of an Altair 8800, a PDP-11, or DG Nova. However, even back in the day, only a few people really programmed a computer with switches. Typically, you might use the switches to toggle in a first-level bootloader that would then load a better bootloader from some kind of storage like magnetic or paper tape. Most people didn’t really use the switches.
What most people did do, however, was punch cards.  Technically, Hollerith cards, although we mostly just called them cards, punched cards, or IBM cards. There were a lot of different machines you…

External feed Read More at the Source: https://hackaday.com/2022/11/09/retrotechtacular-programming-by-card/

 2022-11-09  No Responses »
Nov 092022
 

Dear Lazyweb, what coin mech should I buy for a 1982 Atari Millipede arcade cabinet? The original steel mechs, and some others I have tried of similar vintage, fill with jams that cannot be ejected. I tried these plastic Imonex 120 mechs which were recommended to me as “less validation but less headaches” but they suck. Every time you press coin return, they just disassemble themselves internally: the stretchy hinge thing pops off its axis. I am far less interested in “sometimes accepts a bad coin or rejects a good coin” than I am in “never get into a state where I have to open the thing up and fuck with it”. In case you are…

External feed Read More at the Source: https://www.jwz.org/blog/2022/11/coin-mechs/

 2022-11-09  No Responses »
Nov 092022
 

Enlarge / The LGP-30 computer, from 1956, that a Redditor found in a basement. (credit: c-wizz)
On Monday, a German Redditor named c-wizz announced that they had found a very rare 66-year-old Librascope LGP-30 computer (and several 1970 DEC PDP-8/e computers) in their grandparents’ basement. The LGP-30, first released in 1956, is one of only 45 manufactured in Europe and may be best known as the computer used by “Mel” in a famous piece of hacker lore. Developed by Stan Frankel at California Institute of Technology in 1954, the LGP-30 (short for “Librascope General Purpose 30”) originally retailed for $47,000 (about $512,866 today, adjusted for inflation) and weighed in at 800 pounds. Even…

External feed Read More at the Source: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1895927

 2022-11-09  No Responses »